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Solar Initiatives

Arizona State University currently is ahead of schedule to reach its university-wide, 25-megawatt (MWdc) solar-generation capacity goal by 2015. The university is on track to have more than 25 MWdc of solar capacity at 90 locations by July 2014 on all four campuses and the ASU Research Park.

In November 2013, ASU reached 23.5-MWdc of solar-energy capacity, which provides more than 40 million kilowatt hours (kWh) annually. This is enough clean, renewable energy to power more than 3,500 Arizona homes for one year and reduces the university's carbon footprint by 8.7 percent.

Solar photovoltaic (PV) installations began at ASU in 2004. A 34-kWdc installation was built on top of the Tyler Street Parking structure on the Tempe campus. A 477-kWdc installation replaced the original system in November 2011.

ASU has the largest solar portfolio of any university in the U.S.; 86 installations are active on four university campuses and the ASU Research Park.

Visit the ASU solar website at asusolar.asu.edu for current information about the university's Solarization Initiative.

There are many reasons ASU is the perfect place for solar energy. Below are five top reasons why ASU has undertaken a massive program to power its campuses with renewable energy:

  1. ASU is a founding signatory of the American College and University Presidents' Climate Commitment, which requires immediate steps to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
  2. Numerous solar PV systems across ASU campuses prominently display the university's commitment to renewable energy and carbon neutrality.
  3. Renewable energy systems provide points toward LEED certification and ASU requires all new buildings to be at least LEED silver certified. 
  4. Arizona Public Service, one of ASU's energy service providers, predicts electricity rates will continue to rise over the next several years primarily due to volatility of fossil fuel prices. 
  5. It's the right thing to do. 

Read more:
ASU LightWorks
TUV Rheinland Photovoltaic Testing Laboratory